Tips & Tricks: Keep it Clean – Pre- & Post-Ride Rituals


Bike maintenance doesn’t just happen when you take your bike to the shop, it’s what you do before and after every ride.  To keep our bikes working their best all of the time, we have these pre- and post-ride rituals.

PRE-RIDE RITUAL

Because of our post-ride rituals, our pre-ride check takes only a few minutes.  All that is required is to pump your tires to the desired pressure. We use 95 – 100 psi for normal rides, or 100 – 110 psi for races. Once the tires are pumped, we are ready to roll with the clean, bright and shiny frames!

POST-RIDE RITUAL

After a ride is when your bike needs the most care.  Putting your bike away dirty is one of the ways to make your bike and components wear out more quickly.  To keep your bike working better longer, our post-ride ritual requires lube, a couple of rags, a paper bag, steel wool and alcohol pads.
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Start by lubing the chain with Rock-n-Roll lube. On days with dry roads, we use the red, Absolute Dry lube. When the roads are wet, or it’s foggy out, we use the Gold lube for a bit more waxiness to keep the chain from getting wet.  There’s a third option which is great for your mountain bike, the blue Rock-n-Roll Extreme lube.
Set up the rags behind the the chain and apply the lube to the lower part of the chain behind the chain ring. Rotate the pedals ten times while applying the lube. Next apply the lube to both upper and lower rear derailleur sprockets. Then rotate the pedals another ten times.
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With a clean rag, wipe the excess lube off the chain and derailleur sprockets. Start with the lower sprocket and then the upper sprocket. Then the chain where it meets the lower sprocket and repeat where the chain meets the upper sprocket.
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Then wipe the excess lube off the top and bottom of the chain by gripping the top and bottom of the lower part of the chain with your thumb and forefingers and rotating the pedals twenty times. Then do the same for the sides of the chain an rotate the pedals thirty times. Finally, repeat wiping the top and bottom of the chain another ten rotations. When you are done, your clean rag will have much of the dirt, grime and excess lube from your chain.
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After lubing the chain, we use an isopropyl alcohol pad to wipe off the aluminum breaking surfaces of the rims in order to remove any brake dust and ensure proper brake power.
If you have a nick or other surface imperfection in your braking surface, you can also use steel wool to smooth out the surface. We use copper, as it leaves less residue on the aluminum braking surfaces as your are smoothing it out.
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Tips & Tricks: Keep it Clean – Wax On, Wax Off


A wash is just the beginning of keeping your ride clean.  In order to make it shine and keep it clean longer, it needs a coat of wax.  This tip always raises an eyebrow. Most riders have never thought about applying wax to their bike. Waxing your car is one thing, but waxing your bike?  Not only does the wax make your ride shine, it also protects the finish from the elements and helps keep dirt, dust and mud off the frame.
If you have a dark colored, glossy frame and have never waxed your bike, you may notice streaking or a cloudiness to the finish. Waxing your bike helps eliminate the streaking and cloudy finish.
Bikes typically come in two types of finishes, glossy and matte.  The different types of finishes require the application of different protectant coatings.

GLOSSY COATINGS

Although most bikes are made from either aluminum or carbon fiber frames, the wax we use comes from the car detailing industry and our friends at Detailed Image. This same wax can be used on your steel or titanium frame as well.
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Your first step is to apply the Optima No Rinse to the frame. you can do this either through a spray bottle or by applying the No Rinse onto a rag and using the rag to wipe down the frame, using enough to make the frame look wet. With a clean rag, dry the frame completely.
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Next, apply the Meguiar’s M205 polish to the polishing pad. Dab a small amount of polish onto the various parts of the frame. Then use the pad to work the polish onto the entire frame. Use a circular motion to work the polish in. The polish is fully applied once you no longer see any obtuse coating or streaking from the application. The finish will feel a bit rough and waxy to the touch.
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Now wipe off the polish with another clean cotton rag. Use circular motions again to remove the wax. You have removed all of the wax when the finish is smooth to the touch.
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Although it seems repetitive, the next step is to use the Meguiar’s Final Inspection Spray to remove any missed wax. Again, you can either apply the spray directly to the frame or to a rag. Either way, use a clean rag to apply the Spray to the entire frame. Then wipe it down with another clean, dry rag.
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The last step is to apply the Blackfire Wet Diamond to get the final shine and protection. Apply the Blackfire to another clean rag and wipe down the entire frame. Then use a second rag as a final way to remove any residue from the frame. Finally, use a microfiber cloth to wipe down the entire frame.
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If you take a picture of your frame before and after the waxing, you’ll notice a huge difference in the shine of your bike. You’ll also notice your bike stays cleaner, longer as you continue to ride throughout the season.

MATTE FINISH

Having a bike with a matte finish requires different treatment than a gloss finish.  Matte finishes scratch more easily and tend to trap dirt more readily.  To keep your ride looking its best and get it ready to accept the matte wax, we recommend using Chemical Guys Meticulous Matte from our friends at Detailed Image.
Working with a matte finish requires the softest cloths to ensure you don’t scratch the finish as you clean, wax or dry your bike.  Always use a microfiber cloth to dry or detail your bike.
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After your bike is clean, or in-between washes, use Chemical Guy’s Meticulous Matte Detail Spray.
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Spray the detail sealant onto a microfiber cloth and wipe the entire bike down.  This gets any remaining dirt and grime off of your bike’s frame and gets it ready to accept the sealant.
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Once you’ve wiped down the entire frame, its time to seal the finish.  Sealing the finish keeps the mud and dust from collecting on the finish. To seal the finish, we recommend Chemical Guys Jetseal Matte.
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Again, place a dab on a second microfiber cloth and work it into the finish.  Let the wax sit for 20 minutes.  Then use another microfiber cloth to wipe the wax off to finish.
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That’s it, you’re done.  It’s now time to get out there and get it dirty again!

WINTER STORAGE

This wash and wax is also a great final wash of the season if you are putting your bike away for winter. When you pull it back out in the spring, all you will need to do is wipe it of with the microfiber cloth and apply a new round of lube to the chain. The T-9 applied above does a great job at protecting your chain from rusting or seizing while in storage.

FINAL WORDS

Whether you just got a new bike, or have been riding the same steed for years, a good wash and wax can make your ride look brand new and sparkle in the sun!

Tips & Tricks: Keep it Clean – Cleaning Your Bike


In some ways, a bike is just like a car. When you pull up for a date and your Corvette, Mazda or Prius (no, not Prius*) is dirty, your date considers “if that’s how he treats his toys, how’s he gonna take care of me?” Same thing goes when you arrive at a group ride, race or favorite bike douche hangout and your ride looks like you keep it in a coal mine, people judge from your ride that you would also get married, and then let yourself go. Don’t be that dirty bastard!
Follow these simple steps to properly wash, lube and even wax your ride and keep it cleaner, longer.
THE WASH AND WAX
Step 1: The Sponge Bath
Since pressure from a water hose or solvents like WD-40 can damage components and even remove the factory lubricant from the chain, it’s best to wash your bike by hand.
This is a bit more of a challenge in an urban environment. We use a corner of a parking structure with a sanitary drain nearby, that way you can dump the water when you are done because direct the solution to a water treatment plant where the grease, oil, and particulate matter can be removed from the water and the cleaned water can then be released. We use Simple Green as our soap, as it can be placed in the sanitary drain with no issues. If you are in a back yard, you can allow the dirty Simple Green solution to fall onto ground, grass or gravel, where it will biodegrade, but be sure to water-in if the rinse hits grass or plants.
You will need the following for the wash: One – two gallon bucket; Simple Green; spray bottle with clean water; a sponge; a rim/tire cleaning brush; a paper bag; some cotton rags and lube. See the items pictured below.
First, mix the Simple Green with hot water. Make the mix so that there are enough bubbles, but not overly sudsy.
Then go to your cleaning area and soak the sponge in the water. Start cleaning your bike by ringing the sponge out over your bike frame.
Next ring your sponge out over the components while running your pedals in reverse. Get the chain, cassette and chainring soapy.
Then sponge down the bike frame to remove all the heavy dirt.
Ring the sponge out over the bike frame one more time to re-wet the bike, then use your spray bottle with clean water to rinse all of the soap off the bike frame and components.
Once you have rinsed off all of the soap, dry off the frame with a clean cotton cloth. Once you have dried off the frame, use a separate cloth to lightly dry off your components by padding the water beads off the cassette, chain and chainring.
Now its time to clean your tires and rims. Start by soaking your rim brush in the bucket. Then clean your rims and tire with the rum brush to get off all of the dirt from the tires and brake dust from the rims. Clean both sides of the rims at the same time. Once your are done with the rims, use the clean water bottle to again spray off all of the soap. Then dry the rims with a cotton cloth. Repeat for the the process for your other wheel.
Step 2: The Lube Job
To properly lube your chain, you will need to find a second spot at your cleaning area where the ground is dry. Post your bike so you can rotate the pedals in reverse. Then place either the paper bag or a rag behind your chain in order to protect your frame and rims from the lube.
Use a second rag behind your rear derailleur and sprockets to again protect your wheel and rim from the lube, as pictured above.
After washing the bikes, we use Boeshield T-9 Spray Lube. This lube was developed by The Boeing Company for aircraft parts and is perfectly suited for use on bike chains as it dissolves minor corrosion from the parts and leaves a long-lasting waxy coating that is waterproof. This is perfect for lubricating your chain after washing your bike.
Spray the lube toward the ground directly on the lower rung of the chain, below the chainstay, while rotating the pedals. Rotate the pedals ten times around while continuing to lube the chain. This should provide a sufficient coating.
Then spray a bit of lube on both sides of each the upper and lower rear derailleur sprockets. Then rotate the pedals another ten times to really work the lube into the chain and moving parts.
Now it’s time to wipe the excess lube off the chain and rear derailleur. Press your thumb on one side of the sprocket and your forefinger on the other. Rotate the pedals ten times. Repeat for the other sprocket.
Then place the rag on the chain where it meets the lower sprocket at the rear derailleur and rotate the pedals ten times to remove excess lube. Repeat at the upper sprocket.
Lightly press the top and bottom of the lower section of the chain with the rag between your fingers. Rotate the pedals twenty times to remove the excess lube.
Now lightly press the outside and inside of the chain with the rag between your fingers. Rotate the pedals thirty times to remove the excess lube.
Repeat the process with the top and bottom of the chain and rotate the pedals another ten times. Now wipe off any lube from the chainstay.
With your bike cleaned and lubed, now its time to protect your bike from the elements. The best way to do this is to apply a coat of wax to your bike.
Step 3: Wax On, Wax Off
This tip always raises an eyebrow. Most riders have never thought about applying wax to their bike. Waxing your car is one thing, but waxing your bike?
If you have a dark colored frame and have never waxed your bike, you may notice streaking or a cloudiness to the finish. Waxing your bike helps eliminate the streaking and cloudy finish.
Not only does the wax make your ride shine, it also protects the finish from the elements and helps keep dirt, dust and mud off the frame. Although most bikes are made from either aluminum or carbon fiber frames, the wax we use comes from the car detailing industry and our friends at Detailed Image. This same wax can be used on your steel or titanium frame as well.
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Your first step is to apply the Optima No Rinse to the frame. you can do this either through a spray bottle or by applying the No Rinse onto a rag and using the rag to wipe down the frame, using enough to make the frame look wet. With a clean rag, dry the frame completely.
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Next, apply the Meguiar’s M205 polish to the polishing pad. Dab a small amount of polish onto the various parts of the frame. Then use the pad to work the polish onto the entire frame. Use a circular motion to work the polish in. The polish is fully applied once you no longer see any obtuse coating or streaking from the application. The finish will feel a bit rough and waxy to the touch.
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Now wipe off the polish with another clean cotton rag. Use circular motions again to remove the wax. You have removed all of the wax when the finish is smooth to the touch.
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Although it seems repetitive, the next step is to use the Meguiar’s Final Inspection Spray to remove any missed wax. Again, you can either apply the spray directly to the frame or to a rag. Either way, use a clean rag to apply the Spray to the entire frame. Then wipe it down with another clean, dry rag.
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The last step is to apply the Blackfire Wet Diamond to get the final shine and protection. Apply the Blackfire to another clean rag and wipe down the entire frame. Then use a second rag as a final way to remove any residue from the frame. Finally, use a microfiber cloth to wipe down the entire frame.
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If you take a picture of your frame before and after the waxing, you’ll notice a huge difference in the shine of your bike. You’ll also notice your bike stays cleaner, longer as you continue to ride throughout the season.
WINTER STORAGE
This wash and wax is also a great final wash of the season if you are putting your bike away for winter. When you pull it back out in the spring, all you will need to do is wipe it of with the microfiber cloth and apply a new round of lube to the chain. The T-9 applied above does a great job at protecting your chain from rusting or seizing while in storage.
PRE-RIDE RITUAL
Our pre-ride ritual requires lube, a couple of rags, a paper bag, steel wool and alcohol pads.
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Start by lubing the chain with Rock-n-Roll lube. On days with dry roads, we use the red, Absolute Dry lube. When the roads are wet, or it’s foggy out, we use the Gold lube for a bit more waxiness to keep the chain from getting wet.
Set up the rags behind the the chain and apply the lube to the lower part of the chain behind the chain ring. Rotate the pedals ten times while applying the lube. Next apply the lube to both upper and lower rear derailleur sprockets. Then rotate the pedals another ten times.
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With a clean rag, wipe the excess lube off the chain and derailleur sprockets. Start with the lower sprocket and then the upper sprocket. Then the chain where it meets the lower sprocket and repeat where the chain meets the upper sprocket.
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Then wipe the excess lube off the top and bottom of the chain by gripping the top and bottom of the lower part of the chain with your thumb and forefingers and rotating the pedals twenty times. Then do the same for the sides of the chain an rotate the pedals thirty times. Finally, repeat wiping the top and bottom of the chain another ten rotations. When you are done, your clean rag will have much of the dirt, grime and excess lube from your chain.
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After lubing the chain, we use an isopropyl alcohol pad to wipe off the aluminum breaking surfaces of the rims in order to remove any brake dust and ensure proper breaking.
If you have a nick or other surface imperfection in your braking surface, you can also use steel wool to smooth out the surface. We use copper, as it leaves less residue on the aluminum braking surfaces as your are smoothing it out.
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Finally, we pump the tires to the desired pressure. We use 95 – 100 psi for normal rides, or 100 – 110 psi for races. Once the tires are pumped, we are ready to roll with the clean, bright and shiny frames!
Whether you just got a new bike, or have been riding the same steed for years, a good wash and wax can make your ride look brand new and sparkle in the sun!
*Riding in the San Francisco Bay Area, we encounter A LOT of Pariah (Priuses or Pri-i, whatever), none of whom appear to either be cyclists, or even like cyclists as they are your most likely offender to passing too closely! Our theory is the Prius drivers are angry that cyclists have a smaller carbon footprint. Beyond our personal observations, the National Highway Safety Administration backs up our theory in that it has found bicyclists are 57% more likely to be in an accident with a hybrid, such as the Prius, than an internal combustion engine car (aka cars other than hybrids). Although it is our opinion no serious cyclist would ever drive a Prius and thus, a Prius driver need not read this article. However, just like every other rule, we have been informed there is an exception. So if you are one of the exceptions, please feel free to read and use all of the information in this article.

Trail: LET’S GRAB A BEER — San Anselmo to Marin Brewing Company at Larkspur Landing via San Rafael


San Rafael is the gateway to China Camp and a great way to return to the Larkspur Ferry from Fairfax or San Anselmo. San Rafael is not for the faint of heart! The high traffic environment along 2nd Street requires superb bike handling skills and nerve as there are no bike lanes and the drivers see you as an intruder with no right to the road. If you are not ready for the intense traffic, a slower alternate route through San Rafael is also available.

-Trail Starts at mile 2.9 of the Coffee Run
-Distance from San Francisco Ferry Building (see Golden Gateway Trail): 44.39 miles; Distance from Marin Crossroads: 30.96 miles; Distance from Sausalito: 34.98 miles; Distance from San Anselmo: 6.37 miles.
Elevation Gain on trail: 374 feet
Difficulty: Overall, this is not a difficult route, although the traffic is a bit intense through San Rafael along 2nd Street and the last descent along The Dragon’s Spine is quite fast with a short stopping distance at the end. The two alternate routes provide easier alternatives to both potential obstacles.


Starting in San Anselmo a couple of blocks after Marin Coffee Roasters, turn right onto Bridge Avenue toward Route 24 and then make a

Make a right onto Center Boulevard, following Route 24, follow Center Boulevard across Sir Frances Drake Boulevard. Just after crossing Sir France Drake Boulevard, keep following Route 24 and make the jog to the right off of Center Boulevard and on to Greenfield Avenue.

Follow along Greenfield Avenue until just before it reaches the stoplight, make a right along West End Avenue at that point.

Follow the short West End Avenue until it meets with 2nd Street.

At this point you have two options for going through San Rafael. The shorter, more direct route is to merge with 2nd Street and follow along 2nd Street all the way to Lincoln Avenue.

Faster Option through San Rafael

The slower, less intense alternate route, above, is to cross 2nd Street and take 4th Street all the way to Lincoln Avenue and make a right. 

This route has a bit less traffic, but more stop lights. Neither route has a dedicated bike lane, but the traffic is a bit more friendly on 4th Street.

Slower Option through San Rafael

Once you reach Lincoln Avenue, turn right. Follow Lincoln Avenue until it reaches Irwin Street, then make a right on Irwin Street.

The next traffic light is at Anderson Drive, which is your next decision point.

There are distinct options for getting to the Larkspur Ferry from this point, the first is our favorite, while the second is a good option if you are short on time, or have already had a long ride.

OPTION 1: The Dragons Spine

To follow The Dragons Spine, go straight through the light at Andersen Drive and continue to follow Irwin Street.

There is a stop sign at the intersection with Woodland Avenue, follow Irwin Street straight through the stop sign.

You will start a climb along Irwin Street as it winds its way through a residential neighborhood and by Bret Harte Park.

Along the climb Irwin Street becomes Tiburon Boulevard (although you will notice). After 5 to 7 minutes of climbing, it then becomes Via La Cumbre and the fast rolling portion of the ride begins. Via La Cumbre will skirt along the side of a hill with views of Larkspur and US-101 below.

After another short climb you will pass the intersection with Bret Harte Drive.

Stay to the right and stand for the short, but steep climb as Via La Cumbre splits into parallel one way roads.

This narrow residential road has cars parked and driveways to your right, stay in control and watch for cars as you descend the next hill which will roll into another steep climb.

Follow the road as it continues to wind through the neighborhood to the first Stop sign. Go straight through the stop sign and climb the next small, steep hill.

Then when the coast is clear let it rip and see what you can clock on the radar at the bottom!

Stay vigilant though, as cars may start to back out of their driveways around the corner at the bottom of the run.

Then one last climb and a wide open “Wee Fast Fun” hill to go.

Again, wait for it to be clear and then follow the Pink Bomber’s lead and fly down the last of the descents! The next Stop sign is at the bottom of the hill just after the road starts to flatten out.

Be ready to stop at that point as Via La Cumbre intersects the busy Eliseo Drive. Turn left at Eliseo Drive. Eliseo Drive intersects Sir Frances Drake Boulevard at the stoplight.

Keep following Eliseo Drive straight through the intersection to the next stop sign. Make a left onto the sidewalk and follow the path into Niven Park.

Keep following the path through the park, but watch for dogs off leashes. The path will shortly intersect Bike Route 20.

Make a left onto Route 20 and follow it to the Larkspur Ferry Terminal, but don’t turn in just yet. Keep going on the path to the stop light where we will meet with Option 2.

OPTION 2: The Dragon’s Belly

Back at the intersection of Irwin Street and Anderson Drive, to follow The Dragon’s Belly, make a left onto Anderson Drive.

Follow Andersen Drive through lower San Rafael until you reach the bike path entrance just before the intersection with Francisco Boulevard.

Turn onto the sidewalk at this point and follow the sidewalk to the path entrance a couple hundred feet (~70 meters) down the way.

Follow Route 5 onto the Cal Park Hill Path and follow it through the Cal Park Hill Tunnel.

The path will drop you off at the parking lot of the Century Theater at Larkspur Landing.

Turn right into the parking lot, then make another right onto Larkspur Landing Circle.

Follow Larkspur Landing Circle to the stoplight at Sir Frances Drake Boulevard.

Cross Sir Frances Drake Boulevard towards the Larkspur Ferry Terminal entrance, but veer left onto the sidewalk and path.

This is where Option 1: The Dragon’s Spine and Option 2: The Dragon’s Belly merge.

FINAL LEG: Beer Here!

From the stoplight at the Ferry Terminal entrance, follow the path under the pedestrian bridge and then make a quick right.

Where the path meets the base of the pedestrian bridge, make a 180 onto the bridge and follow it over Sir Frances Drake Boulevard.

At the other end of the bridge, cross the road into the courtyard.

Just ahead of you is the Marin Brewing Company.

Stop in to have one of the Brewing Company’s microbrews before you catch the ferry back to San Francisco.

We always enjoy a Mt. Tam Pale Ale or a seasonal brew after a long ride. We also bring any of our friends that join us for a ride.

Being able to return to San Francisco via the Larkspur Ferry is a great way to extend a ride deeper into Marin County. Whether you are hungry for a post-ride meal, have time to kill before the next ferry or just feel like a beer, stopping in at Marin Brewing Company is a great way to meet all those needs. Make sure to say “Hi” if you see us there grabbing a beer!

Trail: COFFEE RUN — San Anselmo and Fairfax


San Anselmo and Fairfax are quaint little towns that loom at the base of the Coastal Range. Both are great spots to start a ride or grab lunch. Restaurants and coffee shops are all along the main drag of each town. Some of our favorite places to eat during a ride are in this area. These towns also hold different festivals throughout the year, so feel free to stop in and find your own favorite spot.

-Trail Starts at mile 6.0 of The Larkspur Connection
-Distance from San Francisco Ferry Building (see Golden Gateway Trail): 32.22 miles; Distance from Marin Crossroads: 18.79 miles; Distance from Sausalito: 22.81 miles
Elevation Gain on trail: 125 feet
Difficulty: It’s not about the road, it’s about the destination. With a mix of on-road riding and multi-use paths, this rolling eight miles runs from the end of the Marin Crossroads to the Larkspur Ferry Terminal and is a short, but fun adventure.
Download your route sheet here: Directions – Coffee Run
Starting at the intersection of Magnolia Avenue, Route 15, and Bon Air Boulevard, just outside of Larkspur, continue along Magnolia Avenue toward Ross.
Follow Magnolia Avenue until you reach the stop sign at Kent Avenue. Make a left at the stop sign, then jog to the right onto Kent Avenue, continuing to follow Route 15.
 
Follow Kent Avenue through Ross and past the Ross Commons.
Kent Avenue and Route 15 dead end at Lagunitas Road.  Make a left onto Lagunitas Road, then make quick right onto Shady Lane.
You pick up Route 20 the rest of the way to San Anselmo.
Follow Shady Lane to Bolinas Avenue.
Make a right onto Bolinas Avenue, then make the first left at the stoplight onto San Anselmo Avenue (just like the black Lexus in the second picture below).
This road takes you through the heart of San Anselmo. Just past the next stop light is one of our favorite lunch spots, Comforts.
The Chinese Chicken Salad is a house favorite at Comforts, a popular place for locals and where you will see cyclists around who are post-ride or taking a break for lunch.
If you are not ready for lunch, but would like to have coffee and bond with other cyclists, continue down the street and Marin Coffee Roasters & Cafe, another hub for bike chatter.
With bike racks set up front you’ll see everything from restored 1960’s Schwinn comfort bikes, to mountain bikes to souped-up road bikes parked in front of this coffee house. Riders drink joe and swap stories about rides and where they plan to go next.  If you’ve never had it, we recommend trying the frozen green bubble tea  – a green tea frappuccino with tapioca balls (see below).
For more choices continue along San Anselmo Avenue through the rest of the town towards Fairfax, then make a left, following San Anselmo Avenue and Route 20, just past the 7-11.
Continue to follow along Route 20 and San Anselmo Avenue. San Anselmo Avenue makes a right just after Madrone Avenue.  Just after Redwood Road, there is a “Y” in the road, follow the “Y” to the right and continue along San Anselmo Avenue.  San Anselmo Boulevard turns into Lansdale Avenue.  The road ends at Pastoni Avenue, make a right and then a quick left onto Center Boulevard.
Along Center Boulevard then next place to stop for a coffee is the Java Hut.  This is not only a place to stop for coffee early in the morning, but also a great place to park if you want to start you ride from Fairfax.
Following along Center Boulevard, make a left at Bolinas Road.  On the corner is Fairfax Coffee Roastery.
The Coffee Roaster is at the corner of the route you take to get to Alpine Dam, Mt. Tam and Bolinas. These are the last set of restaurants to get some nourishment at before making some major climbs. (BE WARNED!)
While it may be difficult to make friends with fellow cyclists on hard climbs or fast descents, hanging out in places where cyclists congregate to eat and drink is one of the most enjoyable social aspects of cycling. Swapping stories over coffee or lunch is a great way to hear about rides you may want to take (or those you would not want to take). Socialization in cycling is something to keep the community growing in both numbers and camaraderie. Next time you are out on a ride, make sure to enjoy coffee with a fellow cyclist.

Trail: THE LARKSPUR CONNECTION


Connecting to the Larkspur Ferry Terminal is one of the easiest ways to return to San Francisco from a ride in Marin County. The route takes you from the end of the Marin Crossroads, through one of our favorite short descents we call “The Chase Scene,” through the town of Larkspur and back along another multi-use path to the Larkspur Ferry Terminal.

Distance from San Francisco Ferry Building (see Golden Gateway Trail): 22.65 miles; Distance from Marin Crossroads: 8.22 miles; Distance from Sausalito: 12.24 miles
Elevation Gain on trail: 305 feet
Difficulty: It’s not about the road, it’s about the destination. With a mix of on-road riding and multi-use paths, this rolling eight miles runs from the end of the Marin Crossroads to the Larkspur Ferry Terminal and is a short, but fun adventure.
Download your route sheet here: Directions – Larkspur Connection
The path to the Larkspur Ferry Terminal begins at the end of the Marin Crossroads.
At the light, cross East Blithedale Ave. and continue down the path along Route 5 until you reach the the first paved intersection, and make a right and continue to follow Route 5 down the path.
Continue along Lomita Drive past the hill where the local horses graze.
Lomita Drive turns left up a hill to the path that follows along US-101.
Keep to the left and follow Route 5 to Meadowsweet Drive.
Continue along Meadowsweet Drive as you cruise downhill.
At the “Y” in the road at the bottom of the hill, veer left and continue along Meadowsweet Drive.
At the next intersection, make a right toward the stop light, continuing along Route 5.
Continue through the light along Madera Boulevard.
Follow Madera Boulevard until you reach the stoplight at Womum Drive.
Just before Womum Drive, merge onto the sidewalk to cross Madera Boulevard at the crosswalk.
Follow Route 16 along the Larkspur Bike Path until it ends at Montecito Drive.
 An alternate to the Route 16 bike path is to take the path to the right after the bridge, Route 18, and follow Lucky Drive to the bridge over the channel as seen in The Sharks Fin.
Turn left at Montecito Drive, then make a right at the stop sign onto Tamalpias Drive.
Make another quick right at the light on to Magnolia Avenue and Route 15.
Follow Magnolia Avenue, Route 15 towards Ross, through downtown Larkspur.
Go through the light at the bottom of he hill and stay towards the center of the lane at the next light staying in the bike lane.
After the light, hop up on to the path on your right.
Follow the path until you reach Bon Air Road.  Once you reach Bon Air Road, this is the point where you would continue along Magnolia Avenue to reach San Anselmo, Fairfax and beyond.
Take a right on Bon Air Road, follow it over the bridge and make a right onto South Eliseo Drive.
Follow South Eliseo Drive, Route 20, just over a mile, up the hill and down to the bike path along the channel.
Follow the bike path until you reach the bridge…
Keep following Route 20 toward the Larkspur Ferry as it winds under the overpass and over the wooden bridge.
Then follow the path next to Sir Frances Drake Boulevard all the way to the Larkspur Ferry Terminal.
Make a right just before the parking lot entrance.
Once you reach the Larkspur Ferry Terminal your journey is complete.  Check the ferry schedule for times, but most of the ferries go directly to the San Francisco Ferry Building, except for the 5:30 p.m. ferry on weekends which stops in Sausailto first.  If you are going to take this ferry, make sure to check out The Hat Trick to protect your bike from the heavy comfort bikes of the tourists.
Whether your goal is to have another way of getting back to San Francisco from deeper into Marin, or you just don’t feel like riding back to the city after cycling Paradise Loop, the Larkspur Ferry Terminal adds another option for your return home.

Tips & Tricks: Get the Most Out of Your Bike – Get it Fit!


Getting the most out of you bike requires a lot of work and effort. Part of that work is performing regular maintenance of your bike like lubing the chain, checking and pumping the tires, washing the bike and having your favorite mechanic check the bike once or twice a year.

Beyond your regular tuning, the best thing you can do to get the most out of your bike and to help prevent injury due to bad form is to get your bike properly fit. A bike fitting is more than just setting your seatpost at the right height, it’s about putting your bike in the correct place for you to get the most efficiency out of each peddle stroke, alleviate any muscle soreness you are experiencing and help to prevent future injury. While bike fittings are important for all types of riders, road bikers benefit the most from a professional fitting.

Photo Credit: Velodramatic

Riders for top teams like HTC-Highroad, Saxo-Bank and Garmin-Cervelo have their bikes professionally fit by the manufacturers (Specialized using BG Fit for the first two, Cervelo for the latter) for not only power, efficiency and injury prevention, but also for aerodynamics on the time trial bikes.

Photo Credit: Velodramatic

For those of us not-so-professional riders, the best person to fit your bike is someone trained in the science of bike fitting and skilled in the art.

The many aspects of a true bike fitting include: type of bike (pure racer, endurance, touring or aero), frame size (including top tube length, seat tube height and stand over height), bar width, drop length, stem length, stem angle, bar angle, gear lever placement, type of seat, seat post height, seat position (fore and aft), foot position at mid-stroke and knee angle at the bottom of the peddle stroke. A skilled bike fitter can make all of these angles and interactions not only work for you, but make each peddle stroke more efficient, more powerful and more comfortable for the rider.

When you get your first road bike, you may be uncomfortable with the typical 45 degree angle position, especially if you just transitioned from a hybrid or mountain bike. So the fit of your bike can change depending on your comfort level with a road bike and your skill level. You will notice changes in the seat post height or stem length immediately after they are changed. But as you progress in your riding you will appreciate the subtle changes like fore and aft positioning of the seat and handle bar angle just as much.

Both of us have had our bikes since we began road biking just over a year ago. Miko’s initial bike fitting was designed to make her comfortable in her transition from a hybrid to a road bike. Her seat post was a bit lower, her stem was angled up and the seat was closer to the stem. The design of her endurance road bike allowed it to take on the hybridesq fitting, while still giving her the road bike experience. This was the right fit for her at the time.

After over a year of riding and minor adjustments to her seat height, Miko was ready for an updated fitting. We took Ruby into A Bicycle Odyssey to have Tony perform an updated fitting. He took her measurements on the bike and checked the handlebar width. He started with adjustments to the seat post height, flipped the stem changing it from an upward angle to almost flat, ensured her handle bars and hoods were positioned such that her back made a 45 degree angle with her bike in the hoods and her elbows slightly bent, while ensuring he back was almost flat in the drops.

The positioning change made the saddle uncomfortable, so after trying a few different saddles, a new one that matched her positioned was installed. The seat position from the stem was adjusted to reduce chafing in this new position. Finally, all of the angles were one again checked to ensure maximum efficiency. During the first ride she commented she felt she owned a new bicycle.

Jon purchased his first road bike from A Bicycle Odyssey. Part of the purchase price includes a fit by Tony. Transitioning directly from a hybrid bike is a huge change in position, control and speed. On his test ride, the bike felt like a great fit, except for the reach, which was a bit long. During Jon’s fit, Tony swapped the stem with one 10mm shorter. He then continued with a full fitting of the bike as described above. The Result: an amazing and efficient ride that allows Jon to ride long distances without pain, or go for short, hard rides without his back and knees paying the price the next day.  When Jon got his second road bike, he made sure to also have a fit done.

Whether you are a beginner or an experienced cyclist, a good fitting can help you improve your cycling, help reduce pain you experience while cycling and make riding a more enjoyable experience.